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Tuesday, June 27, 2017

How To Improve At Chess - 2 Chess Improvement Tips That You Should Keep In Mind ALL THE TIME!

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With so many books, chess videos, articles, etc. about chess improvement, one could get easily confused while searching for the answer to the question: "How to improve at chess?"
When they read a book advocating intense tactical training like Rapid Chess Improvement by Michael De La Maza, they shove everything else to the side and start the grueling tactics training (which in this case involves going through 1000 positions in one day!).
Almost mid-way through the tactical training, however, the news that Jeremy Silman's How To Re-Asses Your Chess 4th Edition has been released and read all of the EXCELLENT reviews about the book. Forgetting the commitment they have made to study tactics intensely, they grab the book and start to devour the chess wisdom from IM Silman.
BUT after reading a couple of pages, here comes another chess improvement video from another internationally renown chess author and International Master Andrew Martin showing 10 things that a 1600 player should do to reach the next class. Guess what? Bye Silman and hello Martin. They shove Silman's book to the side and purchases IM Martin's new chess video.
And the cycle goes on and on and on!
The end result: they spread themselves too thinly and haven't learned anything at all at a level that will be useful for them.
It's about time to change your ways fellow chess amateur if you want to improve. And here are 2 chess training tips that will help you make your training effective and improve in chess:
How To Improve At Chess Tip 1
Focus, focus, focus! I'm sure you saw that coming. We have heard that time in time again, BUT have you really taken the time to focus on one aspect of chess (tactics, opening, endgame, etc.) until you really are proficient at it?
Here's a tip: when you have decided to read a book or a course that is useful for your chess improvement, make a note...NOT just a mental one BUT a written note that you will read that book from cover to cover and understand it DEEP enough to apply the ideas in your games before you pick another book.
Any good chess book will contribute something to help you improve in chess. It's your job to make sure you absorb it. 10 half-read chess books are NOT better than a chess book read and understood to the fullest.
Here's another thing: keep your training (reading books, watching videos, etc.) ACTIVE! Instead of just passively reading game notes and variations, cover them and predict the moves PLUS analyze the position. Only after that should you compare and check the notes.
For videos, pause it for a while. Set up the position on an actual board and do some thinking of your own before hitting play again. A. Nimzowitsch attributes his massive gain on playing strength because of such focus and training. He would spend as long as 6 hours in one annotated chess game instead of being spoon-fed!
How To Improve At Chess Tip 2 -
Focus and active training is important. BUT it's only half of the equation. The other half is just as important: focus on what's NECESSARY.
Endgame study is useful - no doubts about that. BUT if you are losing to simple forks in the opening or in the middle game, then focusing on tactics is necessary! I'm sure you get my drift now.
So what is necessary for an improving chess amateur?
That's precisely what a Grandmaster, chess coach, and psychologist reveals in his chess video course: The Grandmaster's Secrets.
Filled with practical advice on how to train in chess, which mistakes and pitfalls to avoid, how to prepare for tournaments, and MORE importantly (the core of the course) how to think like a strong player, this course is a treasure trove for the improving chess player: [http://how-to-improve-in-chess.com/2011/01/13/grandmasters-secrets-reviews/]
Please, a reminder: stick to it until you have absorbed every single idea in it DEEPLY. It will help you Improve At Chess [http://how-to-improve-in-chess.com/2011/01/13/grandmasters-secrets-reviews/]!


3 Rules Of Chess Success - Master The Chess Training Rules And GREATLY Improve At Chess In 23 Days!

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"What are the rules of chess success?"
Many beginning and improving chess players all over the world are left scratching their heads and asking the question above.
They spend sleepless nights analyzing different variations of the Open Sicilian. They sink their heads on chess tactics training and read strategy books that are encyclopedia-like in thickness. They watch videos of their favorite grandmaster or chess trainer teach a thing or two about playing the endgame.
HOWEVER, despite these long hours spent on chess training, they fail to achieve the consistent results they want!
These chess players may win in a game in brilliant and masterly fashion. BUT they would lose and get crushed like someone who has played his first chess game against a master.
Chances are you are one of these players. After all, if you are consistently winning games, tournaments, and play at a high level, then you wouldn't be here.
Well, don't worry. Right at this page, I will outline 3 rules that will dramatically help you improve at chess within 23 days!
Rules Of Chess Success 1
Play chess often.
This advice sure sounds obvious, but believe me, a lot of players are neglecting this advice. They spend 2 to 3 hours studying chess openings, middlegame strategies, chess tactics, etc. yet they can hardly find the time to play a game or two of competitive chess in a week.
Chess is a contact sport. The more you sink yourself in it, the more intricacies and subtleties you will know about it.
However, playing chess a lot alone won't take you far.
Rules Of Chess Success 2
Study instructive master games.
Again, we have another golden advice that is not heeded by class-level chess players. Many of them would rather grab books like "Winning With The Dilworth Attack", "Winning With The King's Gambit", and the like.
If you want to be successful at something, you need to look closely at the successful people in that industry and study what they do. The same thing can be said when it comes to improving your chess.
Look at how Mikhail Tal blasts the opposition into oblivion with his chess combinations. Study how Robert Fischer defeated the Soviet Chess Machines. Studying master games is like taking private lessons from these chess legends.
Rules Of Chess Success 3
Attention: Among the rules and advices for chess improvement that I have given here, this is the MOST important of all so keep your eyes glued.
Here is it: improve your chess thought process and make it efficient.
Chess is a thinking game. We all know that. Memorized moves and variations won't take you too far. With the millions of possibilities, you will encounter a position where you are all by yourself.
No amount of opening preparation and memorization could help you. Your chess thinking process - if it's efficient or not, will determine if you will come out on top or crumble in defeat.
Learn how to think PROPERLY - this is the most important rule of chess success!
Do you struggle and pull your hairs out when you encounter an unknown chess position? Are you always on the losing end of a one-sided chess battle?
If that's the case, then you should take advantage of an experienced chess teacher and Grandmaster's straight forward, efficient thinking tools, and clear-cut Rules Of Chess Success!
Know what your chess thinking process should be composed of. Learn how to study master games properly. And get more training tips to improve at chess in only 23 days!


How To Play Better Chess - Start Improving Chess Playing Skills NOW With This IMPORTANT Tip!

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How to play better chess?
The answers to that question would be so varied:
- Some would recommend drilling those basic tactical motifs in yours head day in and day out.
- Other would say start with chess endgames...claiming that doing so will help you realize the pieces' full potential and how to coordinate them.
- Some chess coaches believe that the key to play better chess is to master the positional side of the game and develop your eye for plans and long term strategies.
- There are players, mostly amateurs, that believe that it all boils down to your opening choices and chess opening repertoire. Pick the right openings and you should be on your way to playing better chess and even mastery.
- And there are some who don't really care about what you read and insist on playing more games and analyzing those to help you improve chess playing skills.
And we haven't touched even the tip of the iceberg fellas!
All are valid points. You can't take that away from them. HOWEVER, these solutions to the question: "How to play better chess?" forget to tackle one important factor: that chess is a thinking game.
And if you want to succeed in chess, you should know how to think properly - whether you are facing a position that requires long term planning, one that needs forcing moves to be resolved, or a combination of both.
Surprisingly, the subject of having a good chess thought process is hardly tackled in today's chess books and resources.
You will find a wealth of books on chess combinations, on basic endgames, on how to play the Sicilian Dragon or some obscure and tactical 1.e4 opening...BUT you will have a hard time finding a good book on how to think in chess!
BUT don't worry: there are a couple of guidelines that you can use to help you device a good chess thought process. One that you can practice over and over again in your training sessions and games until it becomes automated. And one that allows you to understand the position in front of you.
How To Play Better Chess - Thought Process Guideline 1
Always take a closer look at your opponent's moves and opportunities. The primary reason why chess amateurs blunder away pieces, allow back rank mates, allow double attacks (and basically, remain amateurs) is that they don't consider the possibilities that the opponent has.
Get this: you and your opponent has an equal 'say' in the game. Appreciate your trumps but learn to respect what your opponent have at his disposal. Be aware of what moves he may be threatening and that should help you eliminate blunders and play batter chess.
How To Play Better Chess - Thought Process Guideline 2
There are many factors in chess - development, initiative, open files for your rooks, diagonals for your bishops, outposts for your knights, paths for your queen, king safety, pawn structures, and those are just to name a few.
We are NOT even discussing the MORE advanced factors in chess success that are common in top level play like psychological motives, maximum resistance and defense, etc. I hope you see the point by now. It is impossible to cover all of these with your chess thought process. If only it was, then we would all be masters by now.
HOWEVER, to improve chess playing skills, you need to consider the main driving forces...the primary principles in a chess game when you are thinking of a move or a plan.
How To Play Better Chess - Thought Process Guideline 3 Last BUT not the least, your chess thought process should be structured for practical use...for tournaments and over the board chess games. This is especially true now since we have faster time controls.
If you are struggling to play better chess, if you are baffled of what makes a good chess thought process, The Grandmaster's Secrets - a course written by a well known chess coach, psychologist, and grandmaster, might be the game changing resource you need.
Coming with practical advice on chess thought process: the main principles I was pointing out, how to avoid blunders, how to think in chess if you are facing a tactical or a positional situation, etc., you are sure to learn how to Play Better Chess!
And it even teaches you how to prepare for tournaments, how to choose openings, and those are just to name a few. You simply have to check it out: http://fastchessimprovement.blogspot.com/p/grandmasters-secrets-chess-improvement.html


Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Big companies are willing to pay people just like you for your opinion and finding problems with their video games.

When you join become a game tester today, you will find out how to get paid for playing video games all day long!

We are not going to offer this special offer for much longer, so take advantage of this opportunity while you can!


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It may sound hard to believe, but it's true.  There are hundreds of companies out there who are willing to pay for your opinion and to find glitches within their games.  This is an important part of product testing, and they rely on people just like you for your honest opinion!

One man has single-handedly put together the largest database of companies that hire people just like you, to play video games all day long.

Imagine getting paid for doing things like:

- Pointing out mistakes and glitches in  video games
- Getting paid to test the Newest and Most Poplular Games
- Working from home and gaming as little or as much as you want

When you join, you'll have access to all of the companies hand selected by Matthew Johnson.

Testing video games in your spare time can really make a difference in your income.

Try it out today and start testing video games for a living!




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Saturday, November 20, 2010

Chess Strategies

By Chad Kimball

If you are a chess student or even an experienced player, the power of the Internet to improve your game cannot be denied.

However, anyone who has typed "chess strategies" or "chess tactics" into a search engine will agree with me that the results can be confusing. Where do I start? What kind of chess strategies websites are out there? Are any of them useful? Which chess strategies information is accurate, and which of it is misleading, incorrect, or erroneous? Which chess products are worth buying?

Well, there are a few crucial pieces of information that I'd like to give you to simplify your search for chess strategies. This information will enable you to use the Internet to the maximum, so you can find the exact chess strategies information that you need to increase your chess rating.
The first thing to remember, is to do a quick bit of research on the author of the text you are reading. Have they posted their chess rating? If they are a coach, how long have they been coaching? Have their students demonstrated success at the chess board? Don't believe everything you read on the internet.

The second thing to do is to do a quick search at the chess exchange forum for the writer's name or the resource that you are recommending. I've found the chess exchange forum to be a great resource. There are a large number of experienced players posting chess strategies, chess tactics, and tips on this forum. Again, you can't believe everything you read, meaning, just because someone said it on a forum doesn't mean it is 100% accurate. However, if a majority of forum posts are positive about the resource or author in question, you can usually trust the majority consensus. You can also click on the forum poster's profile (usually if you click on their name to the left of the post) where they often provide their experience level, chess rating, and other information. This information can help you evaluate the validity of their post. (You can access the Chess Exchange Forum by going to my chess strategies site, scrolling to the bottom of the page, and clicking the "resources" link.)

I've also found the chess exchange forum to be a great place to discover new resources for chess improvement, as well as a great place to ask chess strategies related questions. The forum contributors are very generous with their time. They will often discuss your questions at length, providing great answers that you won't find anywhere else (especially for free).

The third way to leverage the Internet to improve your chess game is to simply play chess online! One of the best places to play is the Free Internet Chess Server (FICS). FICS requires that you install a small program on your computer in order to play, but it is well worth it. This allows you to gain experience at the chess board whenever you have a free moment: lunch break, late at night, after work. Study is important, but in order to improve you must actually play chess against real opponents! (You can find more information about the Free Internet Chess Server by going to my chess strategies website, scrolling to the bottom of the page, and clicking the "resources" link.)

Online chess coaching is the forth way to utilize the Internet to gain valuable chess strategies and chess tactics. A simple google search can bring up many chess coaches who will charge you a fee to analyze your games and coach you to improve. Often you can email them your previous chess games, and they will respond with a written analysis of the games, including tips for how to improve. Again, remember what I've shared already about evaluating information you read on the internet, and apply those principles to choosing your chess coach. The chess exchange forum is a great place to research and contact prospective chess coaches.
The last way to use the Internet to improve your chess game is by downloading chess software. There are a few pieces of chess software that are crucial to have:

ChessBase. The ChessBase format is quickly becoming a standard on the Internet. Many resources, annotated games, tutorials, etc... are being produced in this format. ChessBase has a full version that you can purchase online, but they also provide a free, pared down version which is more than enough to open and view resources that are in ChessBase format. (Download ChessBase by going to my chess strategy website link provided above, scrolling to the bottom of the page, and clicking the "resources" link.)

Finally, a Good Chess Engine is also essential for improving your game. A chess engine refers to the part of a chess program that deals with the intelligence of game play. Chess engines can analyze games, moves, mistakes, and more. Most chess engines use the common approach of attempting all possible moves from a given position and then choosing the best one with the help of a search. (Access a long list of chess engines by going to my chess strategy website link above, scrolling to the bottom of the page, and clicking the "resources" link.)

Bio: Chad Kimball has been playing chess since he was a young boy, and is now an editor and publisher, publishing chess instruction books and courses on the Internet. He is responsible for bringing an exciting resource to the Internet: "The Grandmaster Strategy Training Library."
This Video Training Kit contains 22 Videos and 2,213 Pages of Winning Chess Strategies for the price of a single chess tips book at the bookstore. These 22 videos and 14 books enable you to confidently sit down at the chessboard, knowing that you are prepared with years of tested strategies to DEFEAT your opponent. Click here for more information about this exciting chess resource: chess strategies.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Chad_Kimball

An Introduction to Chess Sets

By Thomas Morva

Chess is a popular board game across the world. While many people are content to play chess on a regular board with plastic pieces, many players who truly love the game take pride in their unique chess sets.
There are many different kinds of chess sets to accommodate all chess players. Chess sets are made out of many different materials such as glass, ivory, marble, and wood. Some chess sets are especially small or have magnetic pieces, perfect for taking on trips and playing while traveling.

People have been playing chess for many centuries. No one knows for sure where or when it originated, but it is known that people in Persia, India, and China played chess in the Middle Ages. The game spread to the Middle East next, then to Spain and the rest of Europe. It is very likely that the game pieces were altered once the game spread through Europe to take on the forms that they currently have.

The different pieces in a chess set each represent parts of medieval life. The pawns represent peasants. Just as peasants were considered unimportant to people in power, pawns are the weakest pieces in the game of chess and are used primarily as sacrifices. The rooks, or castles, represent home and sanctuary. The knight represents soldiers, who, at the time, were held in high esteem, but not as much as the church or royal family. The bishops represent priests and are considered more valuable than knights. The queen is probably the most powerful piece on the board, but the king is the one that must be protected at all costs, or the game is lost.

Chess players at all skill levels marvel at the craftsmanship that goes into creating fine chess sets. It takes true artistry to create chess sets out of wood, stone and glass. Many chess sets are extremely rare and are valuable collector's items."

"Chess is a popular board game across the world. While many people are content to play chess on a regular board with plastic pieces, many players who truly love the game take pride in their unique chess sets.
There are many different kinds of chess sets to accommodate all chess players. Chess sets are made out of many different materials such as glass, ivory, marble, and wood. Some chess sets are especially small or have magnetic pieces, perfect for taking on trips and playing while traveling.

People have been playing chess for many centuries. No one knows for sure where or when it originated, but it is known that people in Persia, India, and China played chess in the Middle Ages. The game spread to the Middle East next, then to Spain and the rest of Europe. It is very likely that the game pieces were altered once the game spread through Europe to take on the forms that they currently have.

The different pieces in a chess set each represent parts of medieval life. The pawns represent peasants. Just as peasants were considered unimportant to people in power, pawns are the weakest pieces in the game of chess and are used primarily as sacrifices. The rooks, or castles, represent home and sanctuary. The knight represents soldiers, who, at the time, were held in high esteem, but not as much as the church or royal family. The bishops represent priests and are considered more valuable than knights. The queen is probably the most powerful piece on the board, but the king is the one that must be protected at all costs, or the game is lost.

Chess players at all skill levels marvel at the craftsmanship that goes into creating fine chess sets. It takes true artistry to create chess sets out of wood, stone and glass. Many chess sets are extremely rare and are valuable collector's items.
Chess Sets Info provides detailed information about travel, glass, wooden, magnetic, marble, ivory, themed, and collectors’ chess sets. Chess Sets Info is affiliated with Original Content.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Thomas_Morva

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